Rose Hill

Preburn Meeting

A prescribed fire was conducted at property located close to Rose Hill, North Carolina. During prescribed burns it is essential that fire behavior be monitored. Scout observations from deer stands or other places of higher elevation can give insight into what the fire may be doing on a line not visible from a crew on a different flank of the fire. Crew members monitor flame lengths, wind direction, and new weather developments to ensure that the fire stays within the unit and accomplishes the objectives set forth for the burn.

Burn meetings are conducted prior to a fire being initiated. Maps and plans are handed out to ensure all crew members are aware of fireline locations, tract perimeter, individual responsibilities, and burn objectives. These meeting are necessary for each crew member to be fully briefed on the objectives and safety concerns present at the burn site before fire is applied. Weather is also covered since it predicts how the fire will behave.

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Conducting

Planning the Burn (360°)

In this 360-degree video, click and drag your mouse on the video as it plays to explore fire and smoke behavior of a burn at Rose Hill, N.C. You can see how wind conditions affect the smoke column as it rises. Approaching fire can be seen in the distance. Notice the black charred ground nearby. This area has already burned so the approaching fire will be localized to the area with unburned fuels on the other side of the fireline. Notice the differences in smoke color. Darker grey smoke signifies hotter fire when compared to that of white smoke.

Burning Around the Edges (360°)

In this 360-degree video, click and drag your mouse on the video as it plays to explore fire and smoke behavior of a burn at Rose Hill, N.C. You can see how wind conditions affect the smoke column as it rises. Approaching fire can be seen in the distance. Notice the black charred ground nearby. This area has already burned so the approaching fire will be localized to the area with unburned fuels on the other side of the fireline. Notice the differences in smoke color. Darker grey smoke signifies hotter fire when compared to that of white smoke.

Performing a Test Burn – Rose Hill (Part 1)

Test fires are conducted in order to make sure fire and smoke are behaving according to the prediction. Smoke behavior is monitored to ensure it is moving away from identified smoke sensitive areas. If the fire and smoke behaves as expected, the burn can continue. Changes in weather must be monitored to ensure that the fire continues to behave as predicted. If undesirable weather conditions develop, the fire must be extinguished in order to ensure safety.

Contractors often do not wear the same personal protection equipment (PPE) that is required for federal and state agencies. Minimizing the amount of tools and PPE can be risky if unexpected situations arise, but can keep the cost to private landowners low.

Performing a Test Burn – Rose Hill (Part 2)

Test fires are conducted in order to make sure fire and smoke are behaving according to the prediction. Smoke behavior is monitored to ensure it is moving away from identified smoke sensitive areas. If the fire and smoke behaves as expected, the burn can continue. Changes in weather must be monitored to ensure that the fire continues to behave as predicted. If undesirable weather conditions develop, the fire must be extinguished in order to ensure safety.

Contractors often do not wear the same personal protection equipment (PPE) that is required for federal and state agencies. Minimizing the amount of tools and PPE can be risky if unexpected situations arise, but can keep the cost to private landowners low.

Solving Problems on the Scene

The crew members are assessing the surrounding situation and making best use of the tools on hand. Fires must be affordable so landowners can continue to use it as a land management tool. Contracted crews work to minimize costs and ensure objectives are attained by solving problems on the scene. Making use of existing firebreaks and improvisation allows contractors to minimize costs to landowners. In this fire scenario, the crew is working to ensure that the flames do not reach nearby power lines. The crew member is using a leaf blower to blow water from the firebreak puddles to wet the fuels along the line. Increasing moisture can make fire jumps less likely.

In the Event of a Spot Fire

The crew members are assessing the surrounding situation and making best use of the tools on hand to manage spot fires while setting the safety zone along the perimeter.

Using Different Firing Techniques and Tools

When planning for a burn, you must conduct an assessment of the site. Unanticipated problems often arise during the assessment. Planning solutions will ensure a successful burn day. In this scenario, firebreaks are not in a desirable condition, but the crew members are able to think on their feet and utilize tools on hand to solve problems.

The type of fire you apply in a prescribed burn depends on the desired objective. A head fire is used to consume the fuels quickly. These are seldom used, as head fires move faster with the wind and burn hotter than other fire application techniques. In this scenario, a head fire is being used and will meet up with a backing fire set against the wind. Flanking fires are also utilized and run perpendicular to the wind direction.

To learn more about fire intensity and fire severity, please read the Southern Fire Exchange fact sheet,

https://southernfireexchange.org/wp-content/uploads/2013_4.pdf

Exploring a Prescribed Fire

In the video you are witnessing a prescribed fire being conducted at property called Rose Hill. During prescribed burns it is essential that fire behavior be monitored. Scout observations from deer stands or other places of higher elevation can give insight into what the fire may be doing on a line not visible from a crew on different flank of the fire. Crew members monitor flame lengths, wind direction, and new weather developments to ensure that the fire stays within the unit and accomplishes the objectives set forth for the burn.

Fire is applied using a variety of techniques. In the video, the crew ignited a backing fire to create a black line. On the other side of the unit, a head fire was ignited. The head fire moves faster than the backing fire and both will converge at the black created by the backing fire. When these two meet, the fire will go out as all the fuels are consumed.

Ensuring Survival for Longleaf Pine

Special care is taken when dealing with property that has young longleaf pine seedlings that are not able to withstand high temperatures like mature trees. To minimize mortality, time is needed for the seedling to develop needles around the bud and a large root collar. One-year-old seedlings are susceptible to intense fire, so extra precaution is needed to ensure their survival.

To learn more about fire intensity and fire severity, please read the Southern Fire Exchange fact sheet,

https://southernfireexchange.org/wp-content/uploads/2013_4.pdf

Protecting Private Property on a Prescribed Burn

Sometimes there can be safety consideration on site that you should be aware of including personal property. On sites with hunting leases, deer stands and other equipment can be present. Special care should be taken to ensure damage prevention. Fire can be applied around the perimeter of the property to consume surrounding fuels. In the video, special care is taken to prevent approaching flames from reaching the deer stand. The crew uses hand tools to extinguish the fire before it is able to reach the stand. Putting fire around the stand ensures that a black fuel free zone is created and will prevent approaching flames from reaching the stand.